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increasingly remote. let's see what happens behind the scenes there. >> i have heard, wolf, israel says if there's not some sort of cease-fire agreed to on behalf of gaza that a ground war will begin soon. what are you hearing? >> reporter: well, that's what the israelis are saying. the prime minister of israel, benjamin netanyahu in his cabinet meeting yesterday made that point. they're not going to wait forever. we do know that there have been a lot of international efforts to get a cease-fire, including an israeli envoy, a special envoy who went to cairo to meet with egyptian officials. the egyptian government, president mohamed morsi has been very much involved in trying to achieve a cease-fire together with representatives from turkey, from qatar. president and the secretary of state, the u.s. president, they've been talking to all sorts of leaders. let's see what happens. i'm only a few miles north of the gaza border right now. it's eerie here. the cafes are pretty much deserted. i was walking along the mediterranean beach. normally there would be a lot of people, it's a beautiful
israel is not really complaining. >> interesting to watch. >> when they said president obama could not work with netanyahu, it's interesting to see them work on a peace deal. >> nice to have you with us, dana, as always. >>> "newsroom" with carol costello begins right now. see you back here tomorrow morning. hey, carol. >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. we begin with breaking news. a possible cease fire about to take hold in the israel/gaza conflict. the news comes from egypt's president, trying to broker a truce. minutes ago he declared that israel will soon halt its air strikes on gaza. along egypt's border with gaza, reza sayeh. tell us more. >> reporter: we don't want to jump to conclusions. we should be very cautious. there are growing signs from where we are standing in egypt that there could a closing in on a truce or cease fire. latest sign is a statement made by egyptian president mohamed morsi, according to state tv. he said that, quote, israeli gra aggression would end on tuesday. that, of course, is today. that's consistent with
.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hillary clinton's arriving soon in jerusalem about three hours or so from now. she'll go to ramallah, then on to cairo. why would she be meeting with the president of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas? he has nothing to do with what is taking place in hamas and is this really something that is more symbolic here? >> there's a lot of symbol itch because the u.s. has a lot at stake in the palestinian authority leadership of abbas and the prime minister. the u.s. has had very good relations with the palestinian leader whose believe in a two-state solution. israel and palestine. there's a very good relationship there and the u.s. provides extensive economic assistance to the palestinian authority on the west bank. but you know what? the problem for the palestinian authority is, in recent days, as hamas has engaged in this continuing struggle with israel, its reputation, at least in the palestinian community and i
cease-fire, rockets are flying back and forth between gaza and israel. the death toll is now rising. >> hamas's rockets are reaching farther into israel than ever before. israel says they didn't cause much damage. palestinian officials say rockets from israel have killed 24 palestinians and wounded 200 in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several wee
're going to get to between israel and gaza. hamas aims rockets at jerusalem and they miss. but the fact hamas is going after what israel considers its capital city shows how much pressure is building in the middle east right now. i want you to listen to this. so an i reporter captured air raid sirens going off in jerusalem. hamas, the group that controls gaza, landed south of jerusalem. more rockets aimed for tel aviv ende in the water. no reports of damagen either case, though. but officials say 27 palestinians have died since weesday from israel's strike in gaza. this is israeli defense forces video showi what they say, look at this, they say this is munition sites. israel points to the stockpiles as more proof hamas is trying escalate tension. hamas says israel is to blame. people live in fear of how close the attacks will come. listen to one man in gaza just last night. >> i fear my life is at risk by merely being out the streets. i literally felt i could lose my life at any moment. target i targeting israeli civilians, i might as well -- >> he was able to reconnect with us moments
you what kind of concern is it that the egyptians have now pulled their ambassador from israel? are you concerned about your other neighbors who themselves are suffering through some extraordinarily tough times right now -- syria, lebanon, jordan? >> unfortunately, we don't have an ambassador here, and i appreciate the presence of egyptian as well as -- but we cannot argue if he wants to call it's unfortunate that the egyptian ambassador had to go, so we will see, but that should not be a reason to stop any kind of -- that we have to face. >> israeli defense minister ehud barack joining us live from tel aviv. do stay safe, and we wish the best for not only the people of israel, but the palestinians, and we hope that you can somehow come to some kind of a consensus to stop this violence between your two parties. thank you for being with us and for answering. our apologies for the difficult connection, but we have been struggling throughout the hour to make that connection with the defense minister, and now we know why. the air raids going in israel. particularly in tel aviv. tha
important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credited with getting israel and gaza to end fighting. let's bring in the "time" bureau chief and got the interview and joins us from tel aviv. thank you for joining us and why is morsi the most important man in the middle east? >> well, for a couple of reasons. i mean, one he is just sort of central to, you know, the sort of what they call a new sunni axis of influence. sort of powerful country is counterweight to iran emerging, you know, thinking of qatar in the gulf and turkey, certainly. egypt is just always been. it's the largest most populace county and the sort of anchor. if you're the president of egypt, you should be the most important person in the middle east and the circumstances also favoring morsi and the other reason is because he holds the sort of future of egypt in his hands right now and another revolution with what he does in the coming couple of months. >> carl, i thought it was interesting you spoke with him about his relationship with president obama. and he seems to think it's a good one. >> yeah. t
and have an impact and obviously israel, which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and that could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys will be traveling to, you know, various meetings that are going to be taking place want international community and the opposition. we consider them a legitimate representation of the aspirations of the syrian people. we're not yet prepared to recognize them as some sort of government in exile, but we do think that it is a broad-based representative group. one of the questions that we're going to continue to press is making sure that opposition is committed to a democratic syria, an inclusive syria, a moderate syria. we have seen extremist elements insinuate themselves into the opposition. and, you know, one of the things we have to be on guard about, par
-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his top advisors today, and he said he'll consider that, but first there needs to be a dialogue. let's take a listen to the advisor. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president. not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible -- >> we are ready for our dialogue. >> are
with israel, and the united states. and anybody else belonging to the u.n. just for some context here, though, the plo has been a permanent observer. that's been their status since 1974. and that has given palestinians the right to speak out and be heard at the assembly. but it doesn't give them a right to vote. richard roth, who covers the u.n. extensively and is our cnn favorite on this topic, is there to really give a little more context as to what they wanted to and what kind of status it would give them and how far up in status it would actually elevate them. richard, tell us what it means. >> okay. first, just to clarify, hamas not really here with the palestinians. the palestinian president abbas is in new york, met with the secretary general last night. yes, this is, as usual with the u.n., words matter. sometimes one letter in a document could be a time bomb. what we have here is the u.n. upgrading later today the status of the palestinians here. they are in effect going to become sort of a state within a group of states. but really, as you mentioned, they won't have the right to vot
israel. the general assembly of the united nations is almost certain to grant the palestinians a status upgrade. this is a step that palestinians hope will eventually lead to recognition as an independent state. take a look at the crowd that's gathered there. this is yasser arafat square in ramallah. ♪ their president mahmoud abbas live. the vote is scheduled to be happening two and a half hours from now. this is something that israel and the u.s. have spent months lobbying against. i want to bring in jim clancy to put this in perspective here from cnn international. jim, first of all, what does this mean in very plain terms, for the palestinians if they get this upgraded status at the u.n., the significance? >> somebody calls them a state. they are allowed to join international organizations. they're even allowed to join the international criminal court. now, this is what worries israel and the united states because in doing so, they could file complaints with the court about the occupation, how palestinians are being treated. right now they have no such recourse. this is what could
there between israel and hamas had nothing to do with yesterday's vote at the u.n. where mahmoud abbas won his bid for the upgrade here. here's how the vote came down. >> the voting has been completed. please log the machine. 138 countries voted yes, and there were only nine no's. you and i have been talking about this the last couple of days anticipating that this was going to happen here. this was a big blow to the united states and israel that warned, look, don't go there, don't do this, and we heard from the ambassador, u.s. ambassador to u.n. susan rice immediately after the vote. i want you to see what she said. >> today's unfortunate and counter productive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. that is where the united states voted against it. today's grand pronouncements will soon fade, and the palestinian people will wake up tomorrow and find that little about their lives has changed. >> how is it all these other countries, how is it that the -- the united states got it right here? >> mrs. rice is correct. ms. rice is correct, and in terms of -- it's not going to be
.s. believes and has consistently believed for decades that only direct peace talks between israel and the palestinians can achieve a long lasting settlement. not through international organizations such as the united nations. though, the u.n. could eventually be helpful once there is a peace. the united states, canada, and very few others here voted in the negative. the palestinians didn't get all the european support they wanted. this morning actually canada is recalling some of its ambassa r ambassadors from new york and in the middle east for consultations probably for security reasons. canada gave a very public opposition speech before this vote. but the -- you mentioned is it symbolic, is it political, what are the significance -- what is it? it could be all of it, because now the palestinians could join international organizations and treaties such as the international criminal court and perhaps challenge and go after and accuse israel for war crimes for any future actions, maybe join aviation treaties, maybe control the water off its coast in the middle east, it's all uncl
of this. list. . the indications we have or our convicts we have that israel have done this assassination but yet we still need an evidence. all of the investigation are -- all of the investigations are made to acquire the evidence so we can go with this evidence to find out who is behind the assassination and through which we will go to the international criminal court. >> okay. two questions for you, jim. first of all, do they have any evidence that that was true, that the israelis perhaps were behind killing arafat? would they take it to the hague? do they have this? >> if they had the evidence, i suppose they could. but the israelis have said we didn't have anything to do with this. they realize how explosive this was. did they want him dead? absolutely. absolutely. as tom friedman wrote in his book "from beirut to jerusalem" they saw arafat like hitler in his bunker, there was that much hatred for the man. he put the palestinians on the map. he resurrected them. he's resurrected at a time when, well, the palestinians are finally, you know, i don't know how he died but i can say what
, but come without the support of israel or the united states. >> as for the rights of the jewish people in this land, i have a simple message for those gathered in the general assembly today. no decision by the u.n. can break the 4,000-year-old bond between the people of israel and the land of israel. >> the palestinians have had a permanent observer status at the u.n. since 1974, when the palestinian liberation organization oh was recognized as an observer, a position which is not defined in the u.n.'s charter. >>> and for the first time since the election, president barack obama and governor mitt romney will meet. they're going to have lunch at the white house. before that happens, romney will meet with his former running mate, congressman paul ryan. >>> former baltimore orioles doug de census is indicted on insider trading. money laundering for a stock sale in 2008. the feds claim decinces bought $160,000 of stock in a medical device company and sold it for $1.3 billion after a friend alerted him to a takeover bid. >>> let's talk -- real sports now. they say you can't lose your job t
this had measure, a sentiment echoed by israel. the vote was 138 in favor and nine opposed. u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice had very different reactions to the decision. >> translator: we came to a firm legitimacy of the state that must now achieve its independence and that is palestine. >> we have always been clear that only through direct negotiations between the parties can the palestinians and israelis achieve the peace that both deserve. >> palestinians view the u.n. vote as a big step toward eventual statehood. hours before the u.n. general assembly vote, u.n. put out a statement on its official twitter account. we all do that but theirs had a glaring typo. this says, quote, on day of solidarity with palestinians, ban ki moon stresses urgency of reaching a one-state solution. oops. it's actually a two-state solution. the mistake was acknowledged and corrected about half an hour later. >>> state of same-sex marriage before supreme court. actor morgan freedom. >> now across our country, we are standing together for the right of gay and lesbian americans to marry the person they l
. the palestinians, of course, have long accused israel of poisoning yasser arafat. israelis not willing to comment on that. palestinians say they hope this investigation will get them some clarity. carol? >> fred pleitgen, reporting live from the west bank this morning. >>> chris christie says he's finally able to look beyond the devastation unleashed on his state by superstorm sandy and says the long recovery home has convinced him to run for re-election next year. storm victims have been asking about his plans. >> this weekend, mary pat and i, the kids, had an opportunity to just kind of have a few minutes to ourselves. and we talked about it. and we've decided we're going to seek re-election. and we're wanting to get that going today. so i instructed my campaign treasurer to file papers with the election law enforcement commission to seek re-election. and so -- >> there you have it. christie has been extremely hands on in dealing with the storm damage. that has helped fuel a huge spike in his approval ratings which now hover around 80%. >>> in dewitt county, illinois, reluctantly agreed to a co
. >> the indications we have or the convictions we have that israel have done this assassination but yet we still need evidence. >> israel meantime denied those allegations. >>> a fiery scene in downtown sydney, australia, today. look at this with me and you'll see a cab, look at this, of a construction crane engulfed in flames, black smoke. it gets worse. because this is the moment when the crane, this arm here collapses, falls into a building, barely misses the busy street below. here's where the story gets a little bit more intriguing. the operator of the crane was also the manager of the crane that collapsed in new york during superstorm sandy. >>> drugs, gangs, murder. one expert says that is exactly what many americans think of mexico and the country's newest leader here, the president elect, about to set down with president obama in washington. just about an hour from now. coming up next, what this could mean for the immigration fight in america. ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my
plan to back the bid. britain, the u.s. and, of course, israel oppose it. no country has veto power in the general assembly so no one can actually block it. >>> now buenos aires, argentina, for the pole dance south america championship. this is called
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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